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Authority record

Wildbores Infants School

  • CB089
  • Corporate body
  • 1872

Founded by 29 January 1872. First log book entitled Christ Church Wildbores National School. Closed probably in March 1921.

Wilkinson and Baldwin

  • F008
  • Family
  • 1639

Both men lived in Croydon area. Nicholas Baldwin was a shoemaker who died in 1639 and was buried on 17th Dec 1639

William C. Dendy

  • P001
  • Person
  • 1905-1911

At the time he wrote his history of Sanderstead, William C. Dendy was residing at Briarwood, Edgar Road, Sanderstead.

William Charles Berwick Sayers

  • P075
  • Person
  • 1881-1960

William Charles Berwick Sayers was a member of a small but remarkable group of librarians who distinguished the British public library service during the early decades of the Twentieth century. Most of his career was spent with Croydon Public Libraries, first as deputy to L. Stanley Jast, and then as Chief Librarian. But his work as a practising librarian, though well above average, and in its day outstanding in the provision of library services for children, was eclipsed by his success as a writer and teacher of librarianship, particularly in the field of library classification.

William Harry Hawkins

  • P006
  • Person
  • 1898 - 1899

Certificates for shorthand qualifications issued to William Harry Hwakins ( born 1883)

William Page

  • P029
  • Person
  • 1810

William Page was born on 24 December 1810, the son of Maurice Page, a fishmonger of Middle Row, Croydon. He worked with and eventually took over from his father, and moved the business to premises at 14 High Street. He was suceeded in turn by his own son, William Robert Page, before the business was sold in about 1883. William Page died on 15 February 1892, at the age of 82, leaving two sons and two daughters.

In later life, Page became a well-known member of local society, and chairman of the Old Croydon Tradesmens Society. He was particularly known for his longstanding memories of the town. In 1880, he wrote down some of his recollections in the present manuscript. When he died in 1892, it was suggested that he must have mislaid these [notes], for, to our knowledge, no one has ever seen them [Croydon Advertiser, 20 Feb 1892]. They were apparently rediscovered soon afterwards, however, and in July 1893 were bound as a vellum-covered volume, at the expense of the grateful recipient of his kindness (possibly John Ollis Pelton). In 1921, the manuscript was in the possession of Pages son, William Robert Page, who lent it to FW Moore (chairman of Croydon Public Libraries Committee) for copying. William Robert Page died in January 1938, and it may then have passed to his friend and executor, John Ollis Pelton, who, in turn, died in December. The manuscript was recieved by Croydon Library in February 1939.

Page was consulted by Jesse Ward when he was compiling Croydon in the Past (1883); and by John Ollis Pelton when writing Relics of Old Croydon (1891). This manuscript was transcribed by FW Moore in 1921: he incorporated the bulk of the text, in sections, into his collation of the antiquarian notebooks of CW Johnson ( now in Croydon Archives Service)

Winterbourne Girls School

  • CB140
  • Corporate body
  • 1931

This book records a school visit to Sussex made by 47 girls (aged roughly 9-13) from Winterbourne Girls School, Croydon, over the fortnight 8-22 May 1931. The mistresses in charge were Miss JE Cash (the headmistress), Miss Townley, and Miss Cook. The group stayed in Seaford, but also visited Lewes, Newhaven, Cuckmere, Beachy Head, Alfriston, West Dean, etc. They studied various aspects of the area, including nature, history, geography, etc. This was the third year that the school had made such a trip, and was also the last, as in April 1932 the school was reorganised for Junior Girls onl

Winterbourne Junior Boys School

  • CB087
  • Corporate body
  • 1906

Opened as a combined boys, girls and infants school on 27 August 1906, but became a boys school on 1 January 1907.

Winterbourne Junior Girls School

  • CB027
  • Corporate body
  • 1936 - 1996

Opened as a post-infants girls school in 1907. Reorganised for junior girls only in April 1932. Evacuated to Moulscomb School, Brighton, Sussex on 4 September 1939. Returned to Croydon 1 April 1940.

Wolsey Infant School

  • CB024
  • Corporate body
  • 1949 - 1991

Wolsey Primary School was opened on 14 June 1949 with the Head Teacher and some of the pupils being transferred from Overbury Primary School. Until 09 April 1951, when a separate Infants School was opened, the Infants School was a Department of the Junior School. The Teacher - in - Charge of Infants was Miss M.E.Mooney who subsequently becane Headteacher (until 1968) of the new Wolsey Infant School.

Womens International League

  • CB141
  • Corporate body
  • 1917

The Womens International League (in full, the Womens International League for Peace and Freedom) was founded in the Hague in 1915. The Croydon and District Branch was established in about November 1917. The League was based on the principles of 'right rather than might', and of co-operation rather than conflict in national and international affairs. Its convictions were broadly internationalist, pacifist (in favour of disarmament) and humanitarian: the specific details of its policies and interests varied from time to time.

The Branch organised lectures (ranging from travelogues to overtly political meetings), and fundraising events; and it was periodically involved in political lobbying. The Annual General Meeting was normally held in March, April or May. The Branch was wound up as a formal body in June 1976, although there was a proposal that it should continue as an informal discussion group.

The principal officers were:

Presidents: Miss Theodora E Clark (1920-1927)

Mrs Hugh Crosfield (1927-1933)

Mrs Benham (1933-1937)

Miss M Glazier (1937-1949)

Mrs Alan Philpott JP (1950-1951)

Mrs BW Thomas JP (1951-1956)

Mrs Ritchie Calder (1956-1962)

Mrs (Dr) Cynthia Harris JP (1962-1965)

Mrs CE Checker (1965-1968)

Miss Dorothy L Bing (1969-1976)

Chairmen: Mrs Barbara Duncan Harris (1919-1920)

Mrs Lucy Backhouse (1920-1921)

Miss Lucy F Morland (1921-1922)

Mrs de Jastrzebski (1922-1924)

Mrs I MacGregor Ross (1924-1925)

Miss Lucy F Morland (1925-1926)

Mrs BW Thomas (1926-1927)

Mrs Barbara Duncan Harris (1927-1931)

Miss Edith L Hayler (1931-1935)

Mrs Mary Grindley (1935-1937)

Miss Edith L Hayler (1937-[1938])

Mrs Olive E Berwick Sayers (1947-1948)

Mrs MH Kinnish (1948-1949)

Mrs Phyllis G Mitchiner (1949-1951) [resigned over the issue of rearmament]

Mrs MH Kinnish (1951-2)

Mrs Elsie Wise (1952-3)

Mrs Olive E Berwick Sayers (1953-7)

Mrs MH Kinnish (1957-1967)

Mrs SE Humphreys (1967-1976)

Woodford Old Girls Association

  • CB048
  • Corporate body
  • 1902-1969

Woodford School was a superior private day-school for girls. A few boarders were also taken. Boys were taught in the preparatory classes. The school originated in 1867, established by Miss Annie Waters, who was joined shortly afterwards by her sister, Jennie Waters. It was originally located in the family home at 9 George Street, Croydon; but in 1878 the family and school moved into a new house at 8 Dingwall Road. This was named Woodford House after the village of Woodford, Wilts, where the family originated. The school subsequently expanded into the two neighbouring houses, 7 and 9 Dingwall Road. The Misses Waters retired in 1900, and Miss AHB Walford became headmistress; she was succeeded in 1927 by Miss Mary Horsley, an old girl of the school, who had taught there since 1919. The name. changed in 1916 from Woodford House School to Woodford School. The school went into decline during World War 2, and closed in 1945, after the death of Mary Horsley.

The Old Girls Association (WOGA) seems to have been established before 1902. It went into abeyance during World War 2; and was wound up after the death of Miss Horsley, and the closure of the school, in 1945. It was revived in 1951 by Phyllis Fretwell (nee Densham) and Valerie Williams, who became joint secretaries. It established a strong association with Mary Horsleys sisters, Misses Margaret and Gwendolen (Dee) Horsley: Margaret, who had been Secretary of the school, was elected President of WOGA. The Association survived until 1984.

Woodford School

  • CB143
  • Corporate body
  • 1867

Woodford School was a private day-school for girls. A few boarders were also taken. Boys were taught in the preparatory classes. The school originated in 1867, established by Miss Annie Waters, who was joined shortly afterwards by her sister, Jennie Waters. It was originally located in the family home at 9 George Street, Croydon; but in 1878 the family and school moved into a new house at 8 Dingwall Road. This was named Woodford House after the village of Woodford, Wilts, where the family originated. The school subsequently expanded into the two neighbouring houses, 7 and 9 Dingwall Road. The Misses Waters retired in 1900, and Miss AHB Walford became headmistress; she was succeeded in 1927 by Miss Mary Horsley, an old girl of the school, who had taught there since 1919. The name changed in 1916 from Woodford House School to Woodford School. The school went into decline during World War 2. The Senior School closed in 1942; and, after Mary Horsley died in 1945, the surviving Junior School also closed.

The Old Girls Association (WOGA) was established in March 1902. It went into abeyance during World War 2; and was wound up after the death of Miss Horsley, and the closure of the school, in 1945. It was revived in 1951 by Phyllis Fretwell (nee Densham) and Valerie Williams, who became joint secretaries. It established strong links with Mary Horsleys sisters, Misses Margaret and Gwendolen (Dee) Horsley: Margaret, who had been Secretary of the school, was elected President of WOGA. The Association was finally wound up in 1984.

Woodford School

  • CB155
  • Corporate body
  • 1867

Woodford School was a superior private day-school for girls. A few boarders were also taken. Boys were taught in the preparatory classes. The school originated in 1867, established by Miss Annie Waters, who was joined shortly afterwards by her sister, Jennie Waters. It was originally located in the family home at 9 George Street, Croydon; but in 1878 the family and school moved into a new house at 8 Dingwall Road. This was named Woodford House after the village of Woodford, Wilts, where the family originated. The school subsequently expanded into the two neighbouring houses, 7 and 9 Dingwall Road. The Misses Waters retired in 1900, and Miss AHB Walford became headmistress; she was succeeded in 1927 by Miss Mary Horsley, an old girl of the school, who had taught there since 1919. The name changed in 1916 from Woodford House School to Woodford School. The school went into decline during World War 2, and closed in 1945, after the death of Mary Horsley.

Woodside Fire Station

  • CB151
  • Corporate body
  • 1961

Mr Albert Riddle, late husband of the donor, was formerly a fireman posted from training school to Woodside in 1961.

At the time Woodside was one of the four fire stations that made up the Croydon Fire Brigade. They were

No 1 station, Old Town, Croydon (HQ)

No 2 station, Long Lane, Woodside

No 3 station, Brigstock Road, Thornton Heath

No 4 station, Lodge Lane, New Addington

Plus No 5 station which was the Auxiliary fire station attached to No 1 station at Old Town.

Croydon Fire Brigade was merged into the London Fire Brigade in 1965.

Results 651 to 675 of 679